Ozawa’s Voting Record: Pro-rail in a Pinch

Councilmember Ozawa is chair of the Honolulu City Council Committee on Budget and for about four months has been holding two resolutions that would authorize bonds to pay for rail. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has forced the issue by giving a 60-day deadline in a letter they released September 21.

By not putting these resolutions on the committee’s agenda, Ozawa has already cost taxpayers $300,000 – $600,000 in extra bond issuance costs, according to Nelson Koyanagi, Director of Budget and Fiscal Services. But let’s take a closer look at some of the other rail measures.

Bill 22 (2018), CD2, HART’s Capital Budget for Fiscal Year 2019

Earlier this year Ozawa used a sneaky tactic to try to authorize the use of city funds to pay for rail. In a floor draft of Bill 22, CD2, HART’s capital budget, Ozawa included a one-sentence proviso:

(g) Notwithstanding the provisions of Ordinance 07-001, City revenues may be used to pay for the debt service for the $44 million appropriated from the general improvement bond fund. (Emphasis added.)

During discussion on June 6, he stated he came up with “this solution,” because no one had any other suggestions. There had been no discussion of this option during prior meetings. Other councilmembers were therefore concerned that there hadn’t been adequate notice to the public, and the amendment did not pass.

By the way, Ozawa’s support of this proviso isn’t “adamant opposition to using property taxes to pay for rail construction” as he stated in a recent email.

Bill 42 (2017), CD1, Authorizing the Use of City Funds for Rail

In order to address the deadline given by the FTA, the Council recently held special meetings to discuss Bill 42. The bill would allow the use of city taxpayer funds, e.g., real property taxes, to be used to pay for rail. Ozawa voted “no,” but this was a safe vote for him, because Councilmember Ann Kobayashi was the only other no vote. The bill continues to move forward and will be up for final reading on October 30.

When the pressure is on, however, Ozawa pulls through for pro-rail groups, as evidenced by his votes on two measures in 2017.

Bill 34, (2017), CD1, Authorization to Issue Bonds Equal to HART’s Capital Budget

Bill 34 (2017) is the initial authorization to issue bonds to cover capital costs of rail. Ozawa voted “no” on second reading, then switched to “yes” at the final hearing, June 7, 2017. From the Honolulu StarAdvertiser:

City Councilman Trevor Ozawa represented the swing vote, switching from a “no” to a “yes” after he read a statement from the dais at Honolulu Hale.”

All bond issuances must be approved for specific dollar amounts after the general authorization is approved. In this case, Ozawa again shows his pro-rail position when voting on Resolution 17-173.

Resolution 17-173, Authorizing the Sale of $350,000,000 in Bonds to Finance Capital Costs for Rail

On July 12, 2017, Ozawa voted “yes” on Resolution 17-173, which was the authorization for HART’s first bond issuance. Councilmembers Fukunaga, Kobayashi and Martin voted “no.” Six votes are needed to approve bond issuance. Had Ozawa voted “no,” the resolution would not have passed.

Ozawa also does not act with fiscal prudence regarding HART’s budgets.

Bill 21 (2018), CD2, HART’s Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 2019

In testimony before the Honolulu City Council, I asked councilmembers to cut HART’s budget, especially public relations (PR). Ozawa initially cut two PR staff, but then he added them back for final reading. In addition, he gave them $44 million more to spend. Roy Amemiya, city managing director, expressed concerns about this, because it means the city will have less oversight of the $44 million.

Bills 17 and 18 (2015), HART’s Operating and Capital Budgets for Fiscal Year 2016

During the March 31, 2015, meeting of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board, Ozawa stated he made cuts to the HART budget. The record shows, however, that he made no cuts.

According to the FTA, there’s still a $134 million shortfall in HART’s projected revenues. In addition, with a budget of only $848 million for the City Center Guideway and Stations from Middle Street to Ala Moana, it’s very likely that additional funding will be requested. Ozawa may vote “no” on rail measures prior to the election, but when the pressure is on and voters aren’t able to exert much influence, I’m sure we’ll see his pro-rail nature shine through.

Note:  This is a re-post from my site.

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It’s Not About the Tree – How a Process was Subverted and a Community Divided

The November 2017 meeting of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board was the toughest public meeting I’ve ever been to, with emotions running high.  Members of the community who attended the meeting spoke passionately about their desire to support a lighted tree at Maunalua Bay, except the item on the agenda that evening was not about a tree . . . it was about a process that did not follow the law or include proper disclosures.

Following is a timeline of events related to the city’s acceptance of a gift of a lighted tree at Maunalua Bay:

  • April 26, 2017 – First reading of Bill 40 to create an adopt-a-tree-program to be administered by the city Department of Parks and Recreation is passed by council.
  • May 2, 2017 – Bill 40 discussed in Committee of Parks, Community and Customer Services. The director of DPR opposed the resolution.
  • May 10, 2017 – Bill 40 passed second reading by full council.
  • May 30, 2017 – At the meeting of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board, Councilmember Ozawa announced that a bill was introduced to adopt the tree at Joe Lukela Beach Park.  I was asked by a board member to monitor the progress of Bill 40.
  • August 22, 2017 – Bill 40 was placed on the agenda of the council’s parks committee, but it was cancelled prior to the meeting.
  • October 24, 2017 (morning) – Resolution 17-278, which is for approval of acceptance of a gift of a trellis system and solar powered panels to power lights for a tree, was discussed in the parks committee.  The gift was valued at $58,000, but there was no mention of the location of this gift.  (Edit for clarification — there was no mention of the location of the gift in the resolution.)
  • October 24, 2017 (evening) – Resolution 17-278 was not mentioned during Councilmember Ozawa’s report at the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board meeting.
  • November 1, 2017 – Resolution 17-278, CD1, was not on the agenda that was posted prior to the meeting, but it was “sunshined” onto the agenda unanimously by councilmembers near the end of the meeting, after most members of the public had left.  The CD1 version of the resolution stated a value of $40,000.
  • November 6, 2017 – Two requests were received for agenda items for the November 28, 2017, meeting of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board:  1) A local nonprofit organization requested to have a discussion about the process of acceptance of the gift of a lighted tree, and 2) Councilmember Ozawa, through his staff, requested to have a discussion about the lighting of the tree at Maunalua Bay. The board voted to support more openness and discussion regarding issues of this type in the future

According to Hawaii Revised Statutes Sec. 92-7, the council is not allowed to change an agenda once it has been filed if an item is of “reasonably major importance” and will “affect a significant number of persons.”  The state Office of Information Practices has also stated that agenda items must include “sufficient detail and specificity,” so that members of the public understand what is to be discussed without having to look elsewhere.  The council did not follow the Sunshine Law with respect to this gift, and that was the main concern of members of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board.

Council Bill 40 – status and communications

Council Resolution 17-278 status and communications

Testimony of Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board 12-6-17

Testimony of Natalie Iwasa 12-6-17

Video recording of Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board Meeting November 28, 2017