Community Projects Major Part of Council District 4

As I was gathering pictures for our family calendar for 2019, I was reminded of all of the community projects we did with Our Community Changing Campaign. Volunteers and I took a different approach to my campaign for Honolulu City Council, and I’m proud of the work we did. While I didn’t win the election, I know we made a difference in neighborhoods from Hawaii Kai to Ala Moana and in the process provided an example of what can be done when we work together.

Following are the projects we worked on:

• Cleaned up at Hanauma Bay with the Friends of Hanauma Bay;
• Assisted with the annual Hawaii Food Bank food drive at Koko Marina Shopping Center;
• Weeded a neighbor’s yard;
• Cleaned up the Niu Valley playground equipment and removed graffiti for its second anniversary;
• Cleaned up after flooding at Angel Network Charities and Aina Haina Library;
• Assisted Honolulu Waldorf School with clean up and set up at temporary high school location at St. Lutheran Church on University Avenue after flooding;
• In Niu Valley, Aina Haina and Kahala inspected 500 storm drains and labeled over 400 with “Drains to Ocean. Do Not Dump.”
• Picked up trash and weeded planter boxes on Waialae Avenue;
• Cleaned up vacant lot on Kapahulu Avenue, including removal of engine that had been on site for several years;
• Painted over graffiti on temporary storefront wall on Kapahulu Avenue;
• Picked up trash, initiated campaign for removal of derelict vehicles on side street off Kapahulu Avenue and removal of orange fencing along part of Kapahulu Avenue;
• Cleaned up Crane park, including repainting of park benches;
• Picked up trash along Ala Wai Blvd.;
• Pulled invasive seaweed at the Honolulu Aquarium;
• Picked up trash along Kalanianaole Hwy. instead of sign waving.

Mahalo nui loa to all of the volunteers who helped with these efforts, and thank you again to everyone who supported me during my run for Council District 4.

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Ozawa’s Voting Record: Pro-rail in a Pinch

Councilmember Ozawa is chair of the Honolulu City Council Committee on Budget and for about four months has been holding two resolutions that would authorize bonds to pay for rail. The Federal Transit Administration (FTA) has forced the issue by giving a 60-day deadline in a letter they released September 21.

By not putting these resolutions on the committee’s agenda, Ozawa has already cost taxpayers $300,000 – $600,000 in extra bond issuance costs, according to Nelson Koyanagi, Director of Budget and Fiscal Services. But let’s take a closer look at some of the other rail measures.

Bill 22 (2018), CD2, HART’s Capital Budget for Fiscal Year 2019

Earlier this year Ozawa used a sneaky tactic to try to authorize the use of city funds to pay for rail. In a floor draft of Bill 22, CD2, HART’s capital budget, Ozawa included a one-sentence proviso:

(g) Notwithstanding the provisions of Ordinance 07-001, City revenues may be used to pay for the debt service for the $44 million appropriated from the general improvement bond fund. (Emphasis added.)

During discussion on June 6, he stated he came up with “this solution,” because no one had any other suggestions. There had been no discussion of this option during prior meetings. Other councilmembers were therefore concerned that there hadn’t been adequate notice to the public, and the amendment did not pass.

By the way, Ozawa’s support of this proviso isn’t “adamant opposition to using property taxes to pay for rail construction” as he stated in a recent email.

Bill 42 (2017), CD1, Authorizing the Use of City Funds for Rail

In order to address the deadline given by the FTA, the Council recently held special meetings to discuss Bill 42. The bill would allow the use of city taxpayer funds, e.g., real property taxes, to be used to pay for rail. Ozawa voted “no,” but this was a safe vote for him, because Councilmember Ann Kobayashi was the only other no vote. The bill continues to move forward and will be up for final reading on October 30.

When the pressure is on, however, Ozawa pulls through for pro-rail groups, as evidenced by his votes on two measures in 2017.

Bill 34, (2017), CD1, Authorization to Issue Bonds Equal to HART’s Capital Budget

Bill 34 (2017) is the initial authorization to issue bonds to cover capital costs of rail. Ozawa voted “no” on second reading, then switched to “yes” at the final hearing, June 7, 2017. From the Honolulu StarAdvertiser:

City Councilman Trevor Ozawa represented the swing vote, switching from a “no” to a “yes” after he read a statement from the dais at Honolulu Hale.”

All bond issuances must be approved for specific dollar amounts after the general authorization is approved. In this case, Ozawa again shows his pro-rail position when voting on Resolution 17-173.

Resolution 17-173, Authorizing the Sale of $350,000,000 in Bonds to Finance Capital Costs for Rail

On July 12, 2017, Ozawa voted “yes” on Resolution 17-173, which was the authorization for HART’s first bond issuance. Councilmembers Fukunaga, Kobayashi and Martin voted “no.” Six votes are needed to approve bond issuance. Had Ozawa voted “no,” the resolution would not have passed.

Ozawa also does not act with fiscal prudence regarding HART’s budgets.

Bill 21 (2018), CD2, HART’s Operating Budget for Fiscal Year 2019

In testimony before the Honolulu City Council, I asked councilmembers to cut HART’s budget, especially public relations (PR). Ozawa initially cut two PR staff, but then he added them back for final reading. In addition, he gave them $44 million more to spend. Roy Amemiya, city managing director, expressed concerns about this, because it means the city will have less oversight of the $44 million.

Bills 17 and 18 (2015), HART’s Operating and Capital Budgets for Fiscal Year 2016

During the March 31, 2015, meeting of the Hawaii Kai Neighborhood Board, Ozawa stated he made cuts to the HART budget. The record shows, however, that he made no cuts.

According to the FTA, there’s still a $134 million shortfall in HART’s projected revenues. In addition, with a budget of only $848 million for the City Center Guideway and Stations from Middle Street to Ala Moana, it’s very likely that additional funding will be requested. Ozawa may vote “no” on rail measures prior to the election, but when the pressure is on and voters aren’t able to exert much influence, I’m sure we’ll see his pro-rail nature shine through.

Note:  This is a re-post from my site.

Storm Drain Report – Niu Valley & Aina Haina

Last Thursday I had the privilege of presenting a Storm Drain Report to Kuliouou-Kalani Iki Neighborhood Board members and residents. The report has also been given to city representatives.

One of my main concerns was the way the roadways had been repaved in Aina Haina. Specifically, gutters were paved over, and access to storm drains has been reduced. According to a resident, she had checked with the city several years ago when crews were working and was told the repaving project was designed that way.

At a minimum, the standard that allows repaving to be done in this manner should be looked at, and unless there is a very good reason for almost blocking off access to storm drains, the practice should be disallowed.

Here’s an example of a drain that has been almost blocked off. This one is near Diamond Head. I will post a report about Kahala storm drains next week.

Diamon Head almost closed 7-1-18